STORMWATER @ StormCon.com - August 2-6, 2015!

StormCon Conference Presentations by Day, Time and Room Number

 

Mobile Conference Presentations Expanded Reference

 

 

Tuesday, August 4, 8:00 - 9:00 a.m.

BMP CASE STUDIES

Room 402-403

B11 8:00 - 8:30 a.m.
Developing Multi-Objective Watershed Restoration Programs
Gian Villarreal, Michael Baker International, San Antonio, TX
Daniel Apt, Michael Baker International, Irvine, CA
A successful watershed restoration program must take into account the current state of the watershed, stakeholders and their concerns, and plans for development and watershed protection in addition to water quality, stream stability, current and historic hydrology, groundwater, water supply, regulations, and opportunities including BMPs. This presentation provides an assessment of integration of structural BMPs, stream restoration, and institutional controls into watershed restoration to achieve multiple goals. It includes an introduction to the Integrated Watershed Assessment Tool for Restoration (IWATR) process that allows integration of watershed restoration components into restoration plans, with examples from Texas and California.

B12 8:30 - 9:00 a.m.
After the NOT: Post-Construction Maintenance Considerations
Anna Griggs, DBI Services, North Wilkesboro, NC
This presentation is intended for multiple site property owners, homeowners associations, facility managers, retail facility maintenance professionals, developer managed properties, municipalities, industrial facilities, and others, to provide a better understanding of why inspections and maintenance are needed, how and by whom inspections should be done, and basic maintenance needs of various BMPs. In most cases a proactive maintenance and inspection plan will deflect larger repair costs. Some of the BMPs to be addressed are swales, retention and detention ponds, inlets and outlets, underground water-quality structures, vaults, filter units, rain gardens, and bioswales.

 

GREEN INFRASTRUCTURE

Room 201-202

G11 8:00 - 8:30 a.m.
Landscape Scale Green Infrastructure for Habitat Regeneration, Flood Control, and Groundwater Recharge
Bryan Hummel, US Air Force, San Antonio, TX
Katherine Napper-Ottmers, Ottmers Agricultural Technologies, Kerrville, TX
Markus Ottmers, Ottmers Agricultural Technologies, Kerrville, TX
Kirby Fry, Texas Permaculture Design Projects, Austin, TX
Green infrastructure is catching on in modern developments, although farmers and ranchers have used similar techniques for centuries. This presentation provides examples of contour bioswales, permaculture, terraces, rain gardens, outdoor education gardens, and other low impact development techniques installed over the past two decades on large-acreage rural properties. It discusses how to incorporate stormwater infrastructure into the permanent landscape, along with the hurdles, setbacks, successes, and failures of taking green infrastructure from the smaller urban scale to the larger landscape scale. Several projects in Texas and elsewhere are highlighted. When installed on a landscape scale, green infrastructure techniques increase productivity of the uplands, reduce erosion and flooding, increase groundwater levels and springflow, provide baseflow to rivers during times of drought, and reduce damage to the riparian zone.

G12 8:30 - 9:00 a.m.
Regulatory Consideration for Stormwater Management in Karst Terrain
Aneca Atkinson, Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection, Harrisburg, PA
Many stormwater management programs and BMPs strive to maintain a site’s predevelopment hydrology. What special considerations should be made when the predevelopment condition onsite is that of a stable karst feature? The geology of the site is of great significance and plays a integral role in the NPDES construction permit review process. This presentation describes the complex permitting and technical considerations of a project partially underlain by karst terrain in southeastern Pennsylvania. The permittee planned to use BMPs including wet ponds, a water-quality forebay, detention basins, bioretention, proprietary water-quality structures, an infiltration trench, a vegetated wale, street sweeping, and a system of permanent gravity drains (groundwater injection wells). The review of the gravity drains system resulted in extensive analysis and review because of the complex geologic issues.

 

STORMWATER PROGRAM MANAGEMENT

Room 203-204

P11 8:00 - 8:30 a.m.
Philadelphia Water Department’s Public-Private Partnerships for Greened Acre Goals
James Pollum, Philadelphia Water Department, Philadelphia, PA
Philadelphia is finding new and innovative ways to meet its greened acre targets, as laid out in its consent order for CSOs. The Stormwater Management Incentives Program Grant provides funding for private property owners who want to build stormwater management practices on their properties; the owner can receive credits against stormwater charges, and the city can count these projects as greened acres, helping satisfy compliance goals. Three years into the program, the city has gained almost 250 greened acres and a new form of the grant has been launched to help incorporate larger multi-property proposals.

P12 8:30 - 9:00 a.m.
Solving Neighborhood Stormwater Problems in Fort Worth by Partnering With the School District
Ranjan Muttiah, Stormwater Management Department, Fort Worth, TX
A 100-year-design stormwater detention facility is rarely inundated to its capacity, so additional multi-use functionality can be integrated into the design. Community use of detention facilities provides incentives for landowners to partner with municipal governments to solve regional drainage problems. This presentation highlights collaborative partnering between the city of Fort Worth Storm Water Management Department and the Fort Worth Independent School District to successfully address drainage problems at two schools. Features at the schools include sports fields and associated amenities, low-flow diversion controls, water-quality treatment BMPs, and others.

ADVANCED RESEARCH TOPICS

Room 206

R11 8:00 - 8:30 a.m.
Coal-Tar-Based Pavement Sealcoat, PAHs, and Stormwater Runoff: An Overview
Barbara Mahler, US Geological Survey, Austin, TX
Coal-tar-based sealcoat is used to protect and beautify asphalt pavement in driveways and parking lots, primarily in the central, southern, and northeastern US, and in Canada. CT-based sealcoat typically contains 20 to 35% crude coal tar or coal-tar pitch and from 50,000 to 100,000 mg/kg PAHs, about 1,000 times more than asphalt-based sealcoat or asphalt itself. Tires and snowplows abrade the friable sealcoat surface into fine particles; PAH concentrations in dust from CT-sealcoated pavement are about 1,000 times higher than in dust from asphalt-based-sealcoated pavement. Use of CT sealcoat has implications for urban streams and lakes. Source apportionment modeling has shown that in regions where CT sealcoat is prevalent, particles from the sealcoated pavement are contributing the majority of the PAHs to recently deposited lake sediment. Acute 2-d toxicity of runoff from CT-sealcoated pavement to stream biota continues for weeks or months following sealcoat application; exposure to sunlight can enhance toxicity and genetic damage. Recent research has provided evidence that restricting use of CT sealcoat in a watershed can lead to a substantial reduction in PAH concentrations in receiving waters.

R12 8:30 - 9:00 a.m.
Atmospheric Deposition as a Significant Contributor to Stormwater Quality Degradation
Roger Griffin, Ecology Auto Parts, Irvine, CA
California’s new General Industrial Stormwater Permit demands significant improvements in stormwater discharge quality and gives industry hard deadlines to meet numeric action levels. It allows for “discounting” or assessing the degradation of stormwater quality purportedly from industrial facilities via a technical assessment report on the impact of non-industrial sources such as atmospheric deposition or run-on from neighboring properties. To date, no protocols have been issued outlining what approaches are preferred to perform such an assessment, but Ecology Auto Parts launched a yearlong program to determine, via field measurements of atmospheric deposition, the potential impact of atmospheric fallout or “dustfall” on stormwater quality. Sampling was performed as outlined in ASTM D1739; the method is a gravimetric collection of settleable particulate matter in standard jars set out for a one-month period, after which the contents are analyzed for total solids. Samples were collected at six locations in industrialized areas, coastal facilities, and inland valleys throughout southern California. The results and implications for compliance with numeric action limits are presented.

 

INDUSTRIAL STORMWATER MANAGEMENT

Room 408-409

D11 8:00 - 8:30 a.m.
The Winding Road to Success: Industrial Stormwater Treatment the Hard Way
Joy Michaud, Herrera Environmental Consultants, Olympia, WA
Alexandra Smith, Port of Olympia, Olympia, WA
Logyards and ports are rooted in the history of the Pacific Northwest, and the stormwater runoff generated by these operations is unique and difficult to treat, particularly with regard to chemical oxygen demand. The natural tannins and lignins that make logs great for building long-lasting homes are very difficult to break down through standard treatment techniques. The Port of Olympia had been the subject of citizens’ lawsuits over industrial stormwater, yet there was no known solution to the problem of treating logyard runoff to meet the state’s industrial permit benchmarks. The port sought a solution to meet the permit, one that was also flexible because the cargos handled might change over time. This presentation details the process of finding a solution to treating runoff from the port’s 50 acres of paved surface, including more than 100 bench-scale tests of various bioretention media components and composites and pilot testing of an innovative bioretention facility.

D12 8:30 - 9:00 a.m.
Three Innovative Stormwater Treatment Approaches for Three Linked Industrial Sites, Port of Tacoma, WA
Ross Dunning, Kennedy/Jenks Consultants, Federal Way, WA
Anita Fichthorn, Port of Tacoma, Tacoma, WA
The Port of Tacoma is responsible for maintenance of the stormwater systems at the 50-acre Olympic Container Terminal, the 11-acre North Intermodal Yard, and the 16-acre South Intermodal Yard. Stormwater runoff from the three sites is covered under the state’s industrial permit, and all three facilities reached the “level 3” corrective action staged for zinc, triggering a treatment requirement. An evaluation of each site’s operational constraints and specific stormwater characteristics, hydraulic modeling of the eight drainage basins and the three sites, and evaluation of the design and treatment capabilities of several proprietary and non-proprietary treatment approaches were conducted. Three different proprietary, gravity-based treatment solutions were recommended to meet each individual location’s operational needs: the Contech Jellyfish, Modular Wetlands MWS-Linear 2.0, and Hydro International Up-Flow treatment systems were installed at the SIM, NIM, and OCT sites respectively. The NIM and OCT installations represent the first-ever application of the two technologies at industrial facilities. The presentation includes detailed review of system monitoring.

 

TEXAS A&M TRACK

Room 404


 

 


Tuesday, August 4, 1:30 - 3:00 p.m.

 

BMP CASE STUDIES

Room 402-403

B21 1:30 - 2:00 p.m.
Achieving Phosphorus Reductions From Stormwater on a Large Scale Using Coagulant Treatment
James Bachhuber, Brown and Caldwell, Milwaukee, WI
Caroline Burger, Brown and Caldwell, Milwaukee, WI
Eutrophic conditions in the Midwest are causing serious problems on lakes and rivers; the cyanobacteria levels in Lake Erie in the summer of 2014 made national headlines, but these same conditions exist in other water bodies. Madison, WI, is on an isthmus between two large lakes, Monona and Mendota, which both experience blue-green algae outbreaks in the summer. The city’s MS4 permit includes aggressive phosphorus reduction requirements to met TMDL goals. The city initiated an innovative approach to reduce phosphorus, diverting wet-weather flows from an urban stream and treating the water offline using a coagulant for enhanced phosphorus reduction. A study is underway to determine feasibility, including preliminary design of a channel diversion to maintain baseflow in the stream and divert higher flows to a treatment system, determining optimal coagulant for local conditions, design of the treatment system, and a floc removal process. The presentation covers the technical aspects of the project, lessons learned, and other chemical treatment programs that have been implemented across the US.

B22 2:00 - 2:30 p.m.
Bio-sorption Activated Media Filters for Water-Quality Improvement
Marty Wanielista, University of Central Florida, Winter Park, FL
Surface and ground waters may be limited in use by high nitrogen levels. Protection is of particular importance in areas where the natural soils do not remove nitrogen compounds—typically coastal and springshed areas, some with significant urban development. Regional facilities like dry retention basins and wet ponds may not remove significant nitrogen and phosphorus; a filter is needed. LID options may also need to be altered using filters to remove nutrients. Performance data are presented for filter media before stormwater enters the groundwater. These filters typically have both chemical and biological removal mechanisms and fall under the heading of bio-sorption activated media. Media exhaustion studies and a cost evaluation are presented, along with urban retrofit case studies.

B23 2:30 - 3:00 p.m.
Optimization of Biochar-Based Stormwater Filtration Media
Myles Gray, Oregon State University, Portland, OR
Biochar is an emerging stormwater BMP for a range of applications and contaminants. Biochar is a granular, highly porous by-product of bioenergy production and can be considered a lower-cost “green” alternative to activated carbon. Studies in the Pacific Northwest are examining biochars most effective for the removal of specific contaminants, beginning with dissolved copper and zinc. Results have shown that high-flow-rate biochar-based filtration mixtures are capable of removing more than 95% of dissolved and total copper and zinc over long timescales.

GREEN INFRASTRUCTURE

Room 201-202

G21 1:30 - 2:00 p.m.
Out of the Sewer, Into the Park: How Regional Green Infrastructure Systems Can Help Overcome Challenges in Urban Environments
Susan McDaniels, CH2M Hill, Philadelphia, PA
Jessica Brooks, Philadelphia Water Department, Philadelphia, PA
As more municipalities implement green infrastructure, they struggle to overcome potential constructability, maintenance, and economic challenges of a distributed, localized network of green infrastructure. This presentation shows how regional green infrastructure facilities may be able to cost-effectively overcome some of these challenges and how the potential for implementing regional green infrastructure in public spaces can be evaluated. Philadelphia’s landmark Green City, Clean Waters program is implementing green infrastructure to manage runoff from nearly 10,000 acres of impervious area, looking to large public spaces like parks, school fields, recreation centers, and vacant areas as potential locations. A detailed planning and engineering process has been developed and applied to a number of sites, involving use of GIS tools to develop surface flow networks to guide the initial layout of potential separate storm sewer networks. Detailed cost estimates were developed for higher-ranking alternatives, allowing for direct cost-efficiency comparisons between different pipe runs. Results show that regional systems have the potential to cost-effectively complement and in some areas replace distributed green infrastructure systems.

G22 2:00 - 2:30 p.m.
Removing Barriers to Low Impact Development in Municipal Codes in California—Part 2
Daniel Apt, RBF Consulting, Irvine, CA
Darla Inglis, University of California Davis, Davis, CA
Through a Proposition 84 Stormwater Grant from the California State Water Resources Control Board, 25 municipalities are receiving assistance to update their municipal codes to remove barriers to low impact development. The emphasis is on integrating LID requirements within the local regulatory structure of codes and ordinances. The project targets municipal code categories with the highest potential for water-quality benefits: parking lot, roadway, landscape, and subdivision requirements. The project provides adoption-ready code language to the municipalities, training for municipal staff who review and approve LID projects, publication of case studies, and development of standard LID plans and specifications for reference in the updated codes. This is a follow-on to a 2014 StormCon presentation.

G23 2:30 - 3:00 p.m.
IndyRezone Project: Building a Dynamic and Sustainable Community
Heather Williams, AMEC Environment and Infrastructure, Indianapolis, IN
The city of Indianapolis received a $1.1 million Housing and Urban Development Community Challenge Planning Grant. AMEC managed and implemented the grant through the three-year IndyRezone Project, which updated ordinances, regulations, and design practices at a countywide level, including neighborhood-specific approaches that improved sustainability and livability. Objectives included more transportation choices; equitable, affordable housing; economic competitiveness; support for existing communities; coordination of policies and leveraging of investment; and valuing communities and neighborhoods. The focus of this presentation is on draft revisions to the code such as green factor, compensatory storage, low impact development, stream buffer protection, minimum densities, mixed-use districts, and multimodal connectivity options.

STORMWATER PROGRAM MANAGEMENT

Room 203-204

P21 1:30 - 2:00 p.m.
Stormwater Fee Development: Making Data and Policy Agree
Carrie McCrea, Amec Foster Wheeler, Denver, CO
A user fee can be an excellent source of funding, but designing a stormwater rate structure and billing system can be a bewildering process. What will be the basis for fees? What will the rate structure look like? How will requirements for fairness and equity be met? How will the billing and collection process work? What will the customer and fee databases look like? Does the right information exist to create the system envisioned? The last question is critical: Too often, policies are crafted before finding out what information exists or can be developed. Disparities between policies and data can lead to inequitable rate structures, inaccurate fees, inefficient billing, unhappy customers, and at worst the complete failure of the fee program. This presentation discusses what data are relevant to stormwater fees and how qualities like source, accuracy, and coverage should influence the development of stormwater fee policies.

P22 2:00 - 2:30 p.m.
Using Stormwater Utility Fee Incentives to Promote Green Infrastructure
Lesley Brooks, Freese an Nichols, Dallas, TX
Trey Shanks, Freese and Nichols, Dallas, TX
Perry Harts, City of Frisco, TX
In addition to providing program funding, stormwater utility fees can also provide the means to encourage quality development. Stormwater utility fee credits can be made available for developments that reduce their impacts on the quantity and quality of runoff conveyed to the municipal system. This presentation provides a short review of stormwater utility fees in the North Texas region and looks specifically at Frisco’s fee program and credit system, which has a goal of encouraging better stormwater management practices and reducing the effects of development in one of the fastest growing cities in the nation.

P23 2:30 - 3:00 p.m.
Envision Your Investment in Stormwater
Lisa Skutecki, Brown and Caldwell, San Diego, CA
Oliver Galang, Brown and Caldwell, Los Angeles, CA
The County of San Diego is working to develop a comparative assessment of structural stormwater BMPs using a triple-bottom-line approach to identify benefits and impacts. Assessment includes quantitative and qualitative evaluation comparing potential project costs, social outcomes, environmental performance, and monetized benefits of 21 BMP categories. The qualitative assessment was determined based on the Institute for Sustainable Infrastructure’s Envision rating system, which evaluates projects for 60 sustainability criteria in the categories of quality of life, leadership, resource allocation, natural world, and climate and risk. The Envision rating system was applied to the 21 BMP categories to develop a decision support tool the county will use to incorporate sustainability criteria in stormwater project selection; the wide range of BMPs includes green streets, hydrodynamic separators, bioinfiltration, extended detention basins, stream rehabilitation, groundwater injection, and others. The county also uses a quantitative assessment of BMPs based on Brown and Caldwell’s business case evaluation process to perform a 20-year life cycle cost analysis, including monetized social and environmental co-benefits.

ADVANCED RESEARCH TOPICS

Room 206

R21 1:30 - 2:00 p.m.
How Real-Time Controls Can Improve Water-Quality and Conservation Benefits via Stormwater Facility Retrofits
Brandon Klenzendorf, Geosyntec Consultants, Austin, TX
This presentation gives an overview of the structure of automated real-time control systems and how they can be used at retrofit sites. Two pilot projects in Austin will be discussed. Monitored data from rainfall events and the resulting water-quality benefits of the automated control decisions will be presented. In addition, a hypothetical modeling scenario will investigate long-term enhanced water conservation benefits; the modeling scenario can be used to quantify the reduction in potable water use.

R22 2:00 - 2:30 p.m.
Modeling Low Impact Development Practices Performance for Varied-Density Residential Development
Fouad Jaber, Texas A&M University, Dallas, TX
LID practices have been shown to decrease surface runoff volumes and pollutant loadings, but LID can have different effectiveness under a variety of conditions. This study assessed the effectiveness of LIDs under various types of urban planning scenarios (compact high-density, conventional medium-density, and conservational medium-density) and various LID conditions (types, locations, etc.). Effectiveness of the LID practices for reducing surface runoff, nitrate, and total phosphorus was investigated at the development scale. The simulations included rain gardens, rainwater harvesting systems, and permeable pavements. The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) was used. Results and suggestions for strategies to use LID on a watershed scale are presented.

R23 2:30 - 3:00 p.m.
Pollutant Export From Bioretention: Using Field Studies to Solve the Problem
Andy Rheaume, City of Redmond Public Works Department, Redmond, WA
Dylan Ahearn, Herrera Environmental Consultants, Seattle, WA
Douglas Howie, Washington State Department of Ecology, Lacey, WA
The city of Redmond, WA, completed a monitoring project in 2013 that showed significant pollutant export from a roadside bioretention system with underdrain and liner. To confirm the results and investigate alternative bioretention soil mixes that do not exhibit similar pollutant export, the city evaluated performance of six new bioretention systems with different mixes: 60/40 sand/compost, 60/15/15/10 sand/compost/biochar/shredded bark; 80/20 sand/coco peat; loamy sand 1; and loamy sand 2. Continuous flow data were collected over a one-year period to characterize pollutant flush from the systems. Each system exported nutrients to the underdrain, and the systems containing sand and compost also exported copper. Further analyses to isolate sources of nutrients and copper in the media determined that compost was the primary source of copper, total phosphorus, and total Kjeldahl nitrogen. Biochar appeared to be the greatest contributor to nitrate export. Loamy sands and coir appeared to leach the least nutrients and copper.

INDUSTRIAL STORMWATER MANAGEMENT

Room 408-409

D21 1:30 - 2:00 p.m.
Fuel Spills at Service Stations: Implications for Infiltration Best Management Practice Design
Scott Storms, AQCS Environmental, San Diego, CA
New and redeveloped service stations are often required to install infiltration BMPs, which may not be designed to prevent infiltration of fuel in the event of a spill. This presentation examines self-reported spill data collected by the California Office of Emergency Management over an eight-year period to determine the frequency and magnitude of fuel spills at service stations. Reported spills greater than 1 gallon occur at a frequency of one every 3.7 facility-years, spills greater than 5 gallons one every 8.5 facility-years, and spills greater than 100 gallons one every 136 facility-years. These results suggest that spills occur at a sufficient frequency to require additional BMP design elements to prevent spilled fuel from contaminating infiltration BMPs.

D22 2:00 - 2:30 p.m.
Fulfilling MS4 Industrial Stormwater Management Requirements by Administering General NPDES Industrial Stormwater Discharge Permits on Behalf of the State
Jon Wilson, City of Eugene, OR
The city of Eugene entered into a Memorandum of Agreement with the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality for the administration of general industrial stormwater discharge permits for sites within the city’s urban growth boundary. The MOA designates the city as an agent of the DEQ and outlines responsibilities of both. The arrangement benefits the municipality in a number of ways, including allowing greater influence on the permit development process, developing close working relationships with the industrial community and regulatory agency, and subsidizing the cost of the city’s industrial stormwater program through fee sharing. Municipal staff are also involved in the permit development process and are able to provide high-quality technical assistance, which reduces instances of noncompliance, civil penalties, and third-party lawsuits and reduces the pollutant load in municipal stormwater. The city is able to work with businesses to find low-cost pollutant reduction solutions whenever possible.

D23 2:30 - 3:00 p.m.
Industrial Stormwater Management: Tales From California
Matt Lentz, GSI Environmental, Newport Beach, CA
After more than 12 years and six drafts, California has reissued its Industrial Stormwater General Permit. This presentation discusses how nearly 10,000 California industrial sites were faced with a new permit that was light years ahead of the existing permit, with mandatory electronic filing, a new certification program for stormwater professionals, and incorporation of numeric limits. To address concerns about consistent implementation of a complicated permit, the State Water Resources Control Board developed a new Qualified Industrial Stormwater Practitioner (QISP) certification and required sites exceeding the new numeric action levels (NALs) to enlist the services of a QISP or have staff certified as a QISP. The presentation also looks at the incorporation of NALs and their implications. It looks at trends across the country regarding new industrial stormwater permits and potential short- and long-term strategies industrial sites should consider.

 

TEXAS A&M TRACK

Room 404


 

Tuesday, August 4, 3:30 - 5:00 p.m.

BMP CASE STUDIES

Room 402-403

B31 3:30 - 4:00 p.m.
The Challenges of Dredging and Dewatering Sediment in a Fully Developed Watershed: Villa Park Wetland Restoration Project
Bob Fossum, Capitol Region Watershed District, St. Paul, MN
Mark Doneux, Capitol Region Watershed District, St. Paul, MN
Kristine Giga, City of Roseville, MN
In 2009, the Capitol Region Watershed District completed the Villa Park Wetland Management Plan, identifying multiple projects to deal with the elevated phosphorus loads entering Lake McCarrons. The solutions identified were to be implemented in a sequential order; the first step was to increase the storage of wetland cells in the Villa Park system. This called for the removal of approximately 20,000 cubic yards of sediment. Various methods of removal and sediment dewatering were investigated, taking into account the fact that the wetland system couldn’t be taken offline during the project, the significant groundwater contributions to the system, limited space for dewatering, habitat issues, and neighborhood concerns.

B32 4:00 - 4:30 p.m.
Improving Water Quality—One Ravine at a Time
Todd Shoemaker, Wenck Associates, Woodbury, MN
Ed Matthiesen, Wenck Associates, Maple Plain, MN
Lucius Jonett, Wenck Associates, Maple Plain, MN
Since 2000, Wenck Associates has studied more than 60 bank stabilization project throughout the Upper Midwest and has identified a parallel between streams (permanently submerged, occasionally high-velocity channels) and ravines (occasionally flowing, high-velocity channels) that allows adaption and design of bioengineered solutions that address the root cause of destabilization and erosion. The multi-step process includes thinning tree canopy to reestablish ground cover species, temporarily diverting flow, creating a series of step pools, smoothing eroded slopes, removing or redirecting storm sewers, and revegetating. This presentation highlights several examples.

B33 4:30 - 5:00 p.m.
Cole Park, Corpus Christi Bay, and a Tale of Cups
Jason Maldonado, Lockwood, Andrews & Newnam, Houston, TX
Temple Williamson, City of Corpus Christi, TX
Cole Park in Corpus Christi, TX, is a popular tourist attraction for fishing and recreational activities. Part of the city’s Baldwin-Louisiana drainage sub-basin, it sometimes has significant discharges of floatable pollutants from the outfall into Corpus Christi Bay. To address the issue, the city is investigating potential sources of floatables, developing strategies to capture and control them, and studying whether a floatables control structure could be used to reduce bacteria loadings.

GREEN INFRASTRUCTURE

Room 201-202

G31 3:30 - 4:00 p.m.
Evaluation of Decentralized Green Infrastructure for Flood Control and Other Benefits Using an Advanced 2D Modeling Approach
Michael Kelly, City of Austin, TX
Marty Christman, Geosyntec, Austin, TX
The city of Austin is examining opportunities to solve flooding, channel erosion, and water-quality problems using distributed small-scale green infrastructure in a predominantly residential sub-basin of the Shoal Creek watershed. The approach includes retrofitting the neighborhood with a variety of green infrastructure practices such as rain gardens, cisterns, street trees, and permeable pavement. A project is underway to investigate and quantify potential benefits using advanced modeling techniques including continuous simulation and 2D models to evaluate the extent to which decentralized green infrastructure can augment or replace traditional conveyance and detention approaches.

G32 4:00 - 4:30 p.m.
Revitalizing Elmendorf Lake Park With LID
Sam Edwards, Arcadis US, San Antonio, TX
The city of San Antonio, in coordination with the San Antonio River Authority, Bexar County, and Our Lady of the Lake University, is working to revitalize Elmendorf Lake Park as part of the Westside Creeks Restoration Project. Amenities include a water fountain playground, swimming pool, sports fields, picnic areas, and walking trails, along with nearby drainage and flood control improvements. This presentation discusses the BMPs, including LID practices—13 bioretention ponds and a porous pavement parking lot.

G33 4:30 - 5:00 p.m.
Looking to Retrofit Flood Control Channels With Green Infrastructure?
Jennifer Walker, Watearth, Houston, TX
This presentation describes a demonstration project to create vegetated bioswales within Harris County Flood Control District rights of way. The project is intended to evaluate the effectiveness and practicability of modifying the district-owned and manage backslope drainage system to be considered an integrated management practice that meets green infrastructure criteria and enhances surface water runoff. Results of this project will help develop watershed-wide and regional methodology for water-quality and green infrastructure retrofits of flood control features.

STORMWATER PROGRAM MANAGEMENT

Room 203-204

P31 3:30 - 4:00 p.m.
Clean Water Optimization Tool
Hye Yeong Kwon, Center for Watershed Protection, Ellicott City, MD
TMDLs and local stormwater permits are beginning to require real and significant reductions in pollutant loads. Stormwater retrofits are often suggested as the best way to achieve reductions, along with stream restoration, illicit discharge elimination, and programmatic changes. A comprehensive strategy should account for all of these options and also engage local staff in the process. The Center for Watershed Protection has developed a Clean Water Optimization Tool that allows jurisdictions to evaluate the cost effectiveness of a wide variety of BMPs so a community can decide the best course of action to meet their requirements and reduce urban stormwater pollution. This presentation provides information about the tool and how communities can use it for their own analyses of BMPs.

P32 4:00 - 4:30 p.m.
Utilizing GIS to Identify Potential Sources of illicit Discharges
Jon Wilson, City of Eugene, OR
Tracing an illicit discharge to its source can be costly and time consuming. Costs can be reduced by conducting investigations at key points within the conveyance system and focusing on areas with the highest potential to contain the contributing source of the illicit material. A database of sites containing significant materials like petroleum products, solvents, paints, and chlorine can be compiled and linked to a GIS shapefile for an MS4. The shapefile can be converted to a geometric network that allows easy selection and identification of portions of the conveyance system located upstream or downstream of the point of interest. It is possible to narrow down the list of key points within the system and sample downstream from sites that store the material, are known to have historic contamination, or have aging sanitary sewer infrastructure.

P33 4:30 - 5:00 p.m.
Stormwater Forecasting: When Predictive Hydrographs Are Golden
Baxter Vieux, Vieux and Associates, Norman, OK
Jean Vieux, Vieux and Associates, Norman, OK
Tomas Rodriguez, City of Austin, TX
Susan Janek, City of Austin, TX
Central Texas is often called “Flash Flood Alley” because of frequent, intense storms. The city of Austin operates a Flood Early Warning System, which offers advance information and warning of urban stormwater flooding based on radar rainfall networks of the city, the Lower Colorado River Authority, Upper Brushy Creek, and NOAA. When personnel receive text alerts that heavy rainfall is moving into the area, they can check the system for additional information and activate emergency operations. Harnessing weather radar, rain gauge and stream gauge information, quantitative precipitation forecasts, and distributed physics-based modeling of stormwater is key to the city’s ability to predict road closures and flooding.

ADVANCED RESEARCH TOPICS

Room 206

R31 3:30 - 4:00 p.m.
Water-Quality Treatment Through Full-Scale Replicated Porous Asphalt Cells
Curtis Hinman, Herrera Environmental Consultants, Seattle, WA
The current NPDES permit for Washington State requires use of low impact development practices as the first option for managing stormwater where feasible. Permeable pavement is one of the most widely applicable LID BMPs, but little research has been performed in the Pacific Northwest. This presentation describes the permeable pavement research facility located on the Washington State University Research and Extension Center Campus in western Washington. It has nine full-scale cells, three of which are conventional impervious asphalt, three porous asphalt (maintained), and three porous asphalt (not maintained). Synthetic stormwater was used to apply a known mass of target pollutants including total Kjeldahl nitrogen; total phosphorus; dissolved and total cadmium, copper, lead, and zinc; and hydrocarbons. Results and analyses are presented.

R32 4:00 - 4:30 p.m.
The Effects of Plant Species on Metal Removal in a Controlled Greenhouse and at a Stormwater Treatment Field Demonstration Site
Malgorzata Rycewicz-Borecki, Utah State University, Logan, UT
Plants are known to take up pollutants from water and soil. The metal concentration in stormwater runoff is relatively low compared to industrial waste and mine tailings; however, continual runoff accumulation in constructed wetland and bioretention system soils is expected to result in soil metal levels that could become human health concerns. Previous research indicates accumulation from runoff will exceed EPA regulatory limits for soil contamination after 15 to 20 years of deposition. Two studies in Cache Valley, UT, quantified differences in biomass production and uptake of copper, zinc, and lead from stormwater runoff by plant species commonly found in stormwater detention systems, using synthetic hydraulic loading regimes. A separate three-year field study in Logan, UT, used local urban stormwater runoff. Efficiency of phytoextraction is determined by three key factors: biomass production, bioconcentration factor, and translocation factor. Results show there is a significant difference among species in terms of these three factors. Specific differences in pollutant removal as a function of multiple yearly harvests were also quantified.

R33 4:30 - 5:00 p.m.
Evaluation of Stormwater Control Measure Performance in Austin, TX
Roger Glick, Watershed Protection Department, Austin, TX
The city of Austin has been collecting water-quality data from many stormwater control measures since the early 1980s. This study covers five primary types of controls: sedimentation ponds, sand filtration, wet ponds, rain gardens, and biofiltration/rain gardens. Formerly used analytical techniques may have produced misleading results for removal efficiencies; this study attempts to correct potential problems by evaluating the performances of the different classes of control measures using the effluent probability method recommended by the International BMP Database project instead of the less-reliable percent removal method used in the past. Performance of the five different types of control measures are compared with respect to effluent concentrations of 18 different pollutants. Overall, sand filters had the lowest effluent concentration for most pollutants.

WATER-QUALITY MONITORING

Room 408-409

Q31 3:30 - 4:00 p.m.
Field Data Collection for Environmental Compliance
Ben Morrow, McCormick Taylor, Baltimore, MD
Susie Ridenour, McCormick Taylor, Philadelphia, PA
This presentation provides an overview of a process and procedures for collecting field data required to ensure compliance for linear construction projects. Project owners and operators have many reporting requirements to comply with permits and with local, state, and federal laws. Data collection capabilities have improved because of mobile devices and applications, improved GPS technology, use of real-time enterprise level geo-databases updated through online spatial applications, and other technologies.

Q32 4:00 - 4:30 p.m.
Quantifying Representative Sampling Using a Hydrologic Utility
Christian Carleton, Office of Water Programs, Sacramento State, Sacramento, CA
Representative sampling can be critical in accurately assessing BMP performance and watershed loading characteristics. Unfortunately, few tools are available to assess the representativeness of sampling or the accuracy of flow measurements. This presentation describes a hydrologic utility that was developed to quantitatively assess sample representativeness and flag potential issues with flow monitoring data. The utility uses data generated from rain gauges and automated sampling equipment and plots the times that aliquots were collected with the hydrograph and hyetograph. It calculates the amount of volume measured that is represented by the aliquots taken. The user can compare this output to data quality objectives for each project.

Q33 4:30 - 5:00 p.m.
The Cost of Bias: How Redefining Urban Sediment Through Improved Sampling Technology Can Affect Your Pocketbook
Bill Selbig, US Geological Survey, Middleton, WI
A new stormwater sample collection device was developed to improve representation of sediment and sediment-associated contaminants in urban stormwater by integrating samples spaced vertically throughout the entire water column. Compared to traditional fixed-point sample collection methods, the depth-integrated sample arm is better able to characterize suspended-sediment concentration and particle size distribution with lower variation in a flowing water column. Laboratory experiments show use of the DISA results in much more accurate suspended sediment concentration methods.

 

TEXAS A&M TRACK

Room 404


 

 


Wednesday, August 5, 8:00 - 9:00 a.m.

BMP CASE STUDIES

Room 402-403

B41 8:00 - 8:30 a.m.
Codes and Regulations: Tools for LID and Revitalization in Dallas, TX, and Chattanooga, TN
Anwer Ahmed, ARCADIS, Atlanta, GA
Erich Dohrer, RTKL Associates, Dallas, TX
Codes and regulations are common tools to control and shape the character and performance of development for municipal governments. Often they impose requirements that may not initially be accepted. Although there is a great deal of focus on LID as an effective stormwater management solution, its acceptance and implementation as a revitalization tool continues to encounter obstacles. Two different municipal governments have found ways to overcome these hurdles with creative approaches to foster public-private partnerships with LID as a central strategy. This presentation provides examples from Dallas, TX, and Chattanooga, TN.

B42 8:30 - 9:00 a.m.
Cost Effectiveness of Various Stormwater BMPs for Runoff Control
Hormoz Pazwash, Boswell Engineering, South Hackensack, NJ
This presentation provides a comparative analysis of the effectiveness and cost of various BMPs in terms of runoff control. BMPs covered include underground retention basins such as seepage pits, perforated pipes, plastic chambers, and concrete vaults; pervious pavements, permeable interlocking concrete pavers, pervious concrete, and porous asphalt; rain gardens; green roofs; and harvesting methods such as rain barrels and cisterns.

GREEN INFRASTRUCTURE

Room 201-202

G41 8:00 - 8:30 a.m.
Accurately Monitoring and Modeling Green Roofs for Reliable Stormwater Management
Joseph Seidl, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI
Green roofs and other green infrastructure measures are commonly used to reduce peak flow rates. Recent emphasis on onsite stormwater management has resulted in an influx of green roof technology. Green roofs are evolving, moving away from difficult-to-install intensive roofs and toward integrated tray systems. A major problem in monitoring green roof flow rates is the wide range they experience, from dripping flows while draining to high flows during downpours in heavy rain events. This presentation covers the monitoring and modeling of flow rates from dripping flows to flows greater than 100 liters per minute.

G42 8:30 - 9:00 a.m.
Additional Results from Stormwater Quality Monitoring of the Birnamwood Drive Low Impact Development Project
Michael Bloom, R.G. Miller Engineers, Houston, TX
Nick Russo, Harris County Public Infrastructure, Houston, TX
In recent years, Harris County has begun using LID techniques to reduce the volume and pollutant levels of stormwater runoff from public infrastructure projects such as roadways. In 2011, the county began construction of the Birnamwood Drive LID project, which includes 0.7 miles of a four-lane divided arterial road with a depressed center median vegetated swale; at the end of the swale, stormwater flows through a bioretention system that includes a layer of hardwood mulch, high-flow-rate media, a supporting geogrid, bridging stone aggregate, an underdrain system, and a discharge pipe. Stormwater then flows through a surface channel and ultimately to Spring Creek. Water-quality monitoring of the project is evaluating pollutant removal capability of the swale and the bioretention system.

STORMWATER PROGRAM MANAGEMENT

Room 203-204

P41 8:00 - 8:30 a.m.
How to Keep Cleaned Up Sediments Clean? Reducing the Threat of Recontamination From Stormwater Discharges at a Superfund Site
Mahbub Alam, Washington State Department of Ecology, Bellevue, WA
The Washington State Department of Ecology and EPA Region 10 are jointly managing the Lower Duwamish Waterway (LDW) Superfund site, a 5-mile stretch of waterway in Southern Seattle that is home to many industrial activities. Pollutants in the LDW include PCBs, arsenic, carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, dioxins, and many others. While EPA is leading the cleanup of the LDW with a sediment cleanup plan, Ecology is leading source control efforts and ensuring that stormwater discharges do not re-contaminate remediated sediments. Because many of the stormwater permits in place in the area do not require monitoring for contaminants that are LDW chemicals of concern, ecology is looking beyond the traditional list of stormwater pollutants and investigating sampled stormwater and storm drain solids from more than 20 industrial facilities. Many pollutants, such as PCBs, metals, and PAHs, have been found above water and sediment quality standards, which have been used as screening levels to filter pollutants that may need further attention. In general, more pollutants have been detected above screening levels in the solids samples than in the water samples, most likely because of the pollutants’ greater affinity to solids, resulting in the difficulty of measuring them in the water phase with available analytical techniques. Seattle Public Utilities, as part of source tracing investigations, has collected more than 1,000 storm drain solids samples, helping to pinpoint sources where further actions can be implemented and helping Ecology to understand the diffused nature of many of the chemicals. 

P42 8:30 - 9:00 a.m.
A Stormwater CMP Condition Assessment Sets Stage for Stormwater Rehabilitation in Aurora
Steve Salazar, Wilson and Company, Denver, CO
In 2013, the city of Aurora, CO, selected Wilson and Company to conduct a comprehensive inspection and condition assessment of its stormwater sewers. Approximately 10 miles of aging corrugated metal pipe (CMP) was inspected with video and closed-circuit TV, and conduits were evaluated and prioritized for rehabilitation or replacement. The final engineering report specified design recommendations for conduits deemed to be in imminent failure and included GIS files showing condition rating, rehabilitation or replacement recommendations, and CIP programming for all conduits. The report provided recommendations for a 15-year horizon CIP program totaling more than $20 million to rehabilitate or replace all the pipe within the study. This presentation discusses the inspection process, development of the condition rating and prioritization ranking systems, creation of a capital improvement program and budget, and use of centrifugally cast concrete pipe as a repair method for a pair of 96-inch-diameter CMP pipes under a major roadway.

ADVANCED RESEARCH TOPICS

Room 406

R41 8:00 - 8:30 a.m.
Update on the Stormwater Testing and Evaluation for Products and Practices (STEPP) Initiative
Seth Brown, Water Environment Federation, Alexandria, VA
The only national testing program for environmental technologies, the EPA Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) program, ended in 2012, which has left a void in national-level leadership on product testing in the stormwater sector. In 2012 WEF convened a meeting including about 25 EPA officials, consultants, NGOs, and representatives of stormwater manufacturers to gauge the interest in and investigate the feasibility of a national testing program. STEPP was formed, with a steering committee to investigate further. The committee released a white paper in February 2014 outlining the existing landscape of test programs across the country and around the world, listing challenges of developing a national program and possible solutions, and discussing laboratory versus field testing, test protocol parameters, funding sources, structure, and other issues. The conclusion is that a program is feasible and needed, and WEF has since received support from several states and organizations as well as funding from EPA to go beyond the investigation phase. This presentation provides updated information related to the STEPP initiative.

R42 8:30 - 9:00 a.m.
Raising the Bar North of the Border: The Ins and Outs of Canada’s New Evaluation Process for Oil-Grit Separators
Derek Berg, Contech Engineered Solutions, Scarborough, ME
Until recently, Canada had no established process to evaluate the performance of manufactured stormwater treatment technologies at the national level; this shifted the burden to local regulatory agencies that often had limited resources to devote to evaluation efforts. Some relied on information collected through programs in the US, such as the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection certification process, and others used information provided by individual manufacturers. Recognizing this void, Environment Canada, the Toronto Region Conservation Authority, and other organizations created the Canadian Environmental Technology Verification program to review submitted test results against applicable criteria. The new protocol requires that all testing be executed by third-party laboratories. This presentation discusses the new Canadian ETV protocol for oil-grit separators and compares it to other protocols and processes for evaluating stormwater BMPs.

WATER-QUALITY MONITORING

Room 408-409

Q41 8:00 - 8:30 a.m.
The Quest for Clean Lakes: Evaluation of a Citywide Leaf Collection Program to Reduce Phosphorus
Bill Selbig, US Geological Survey, Middleton, WI
Although data on sources of phosphorus and nitrogen are extensive, few studies have quantified the water-quality benefits of their removal. One way to remove organic detritus and particulate matter before it becomes entrained in runoff is to implement citywide leaf collection through terracing or bagging leaves followed by a street cleaning program. The USGS-Wisconsin Water Science Center is investigating potential benefits of this approach. The four-year study will quantify baseline conditions without a leaf management program, then measure changes in nutrient load after normal citywide leaf collection operations resume. Preliminary results of the study are presented.

Q42 8:30 - 9:00 a.m.
Creating a Partnership to Perform Continuous Water-Quality Monitoring
J.P. Johns, Woolpert, Mount Pleasant, SC
Tim Sherbert, Spartanburg County, SC
Mitch Turner, Startex-Jackson-Wellford-Duncan Water District, Wellford, SC
James Riddle, Woolpert, Columbia, SC
Data from water-quality monitoring programs to comply with NPDES permit or TMDL requirements have great value to parties beyond the MS4, especially to nearby water districts. In South Carolina, Spartanburg County has partnered with a water district to launch a continuous in-stream water-quality monitoring program; the program was launched in 2013 and expanded to five stations in 2015. The county uses the data to comply with NPDES permit requirements, and the water district uses the data to examine water quality and flow in the district’s source water.

 

TEXAS A&M TRACK

Room 404


 

Wednesday, August 5, 10:00 - 11:30 a.m.

BMP CASE STUDIES

Room 402-403

B51 10:00 - 10:30 a.m.
First Response: Storm Damage Mitigation of a BMP Failure
Audrey Beaulac, Hoyle, Tanner & Associates, Manchester, NH
Jason Ayotte, Hoyle, Tanner & Associates, Manchester, NH
In 1992, Lebanon Municipal Airport in New Hampshire extended a runway safety area along a hillside with approximately 60-foot-high 2V:1H fill slopes. A small detention pond was created with a stone-lined spillway and outlet swale. In 2013, a storm produced 2 inches of rainfall in 45 minutes, creating slope failures, roadway washouts, and detention basin failure. A FEMA grant helped restore the detention basin and swale, but FEMA recognized that improvements could be made to prevent future damage. This presentation describes the project, including enlarging the existing pond to accommodate larger storm events and adding an additional pond, installing a permanent check dam and energy dissipation within a swale, installing cutoff walls within the permanent berms, and installing closed drainage systems with energy dissipation on steep sections of the swale.

B52 10:30 - 11:00 a.m.
Technology, the New BMP: Using Real-Time Automated Controls to Minimize Cost and Maximize Performance of a Flood Control BMP
Bob Fossum, Capitol Region Watershed District, St. Paul, MN
Kristine Giga, City of Roseville, MN
Mark Doneux, Capitol Region Watershed District, St. Paul, MN
Curtiss Field Park in Falcon Heights, MN, features a baseball field, basketball courts, playground, and walking trail; a small landlocked stormwater pond within the park collects direct runoff from approximately 38 acres of residential and commercial property and portions of a state highway. The pond has a history of flooding, which limits use of the park and threatens adjacent property. The Capitol Region Watershed District investigated possible solutions and in 2014 constructed the preferred alternative, a large underground detention and infiltration facility next to the pond and underneath the ball field. The inlet structure includes an automated valve system that allows the pond to be drawn down before a heavy rainfall to provide more flood storage.

B53 11:00 - 11:30 a.m.
From Reactive to Proactive: Incorporating 2D Modeling Into Flood Hazard Project Prioritization
Jorge Morales, Watershed Protection Department, City of Austin, TX
Austin’s Local Flood Hazard Mitigation program addresses localized flooding, or flooding that occurs away from creeks. Historically this has been difficult to assess because of the limited analysis tools available, so the program relied on customer complaints to prioritize flood improvement projects. Recently the LFHM program has begun using 2D modeling tools to evaluate localized flooding, similarly to the way creek flooding issues are evaluated. The ability to use water surface elevations to determine depth of inundation gives an objective numerical representation of the severity of the flooding. This presentation will help other municipalities understand this approach to prioritization, including funding projects once needs have been identified.

 

GREEN INFRASTRUCTURE

Room 201-202

G51 10:00 - 10:30 a.m.
Green Infill Development Policy Creation
Andrew Reese, AMEC Foster Wheeler, Nashville, TN
Roger Lindsey, Metro Nashville Water Services, Nashville, TN
Nashville is known for its large treed lots and also for its strong economic growth. This combination is causing a surge in requests to convert such lots to a dense urban-residential configuration. Among the many issues that accompany such neighborhood transition is the impact on stormwater drainage quantity and quality. To address this, Nashville convened a group of homebuilders, council members, staff, homeowners, and consultants to try to reach a consensus on how such development should take place. Almost a year of facilitated discussions culminated in a mutually agreeable tiered, simple-to-apply framework for infill development with both green infrastructure and flood control requirements.

G52 10:30 - 11:00 a.m.
Are We Aiming at the Right Stormwater Management Target?
Tom Hegemier, RPS, Austin, TX
Should we be shifting our stormwater management target to increase water supply quantity first and include the benefits of water-quality protection, rather than our current approach? Especially in the arid Southwest, shouldn’t the first priority in stormwater management be to conserve and expand water supplies? By designing stormwater management systems for water supply enhancement, we can reduce water demands every day by deriving benefits from each house and business. This can yield a daily return on the stormwater management investment, rather than one based on an infrequent storm event rate of return. This can be accomplished through conservation landscaping, shallow berms, native plants, improved soils, rainwater harvesting, and runoff storage for non-potable uses. This approach can reduce water-quality and detention costs and yield drainage utility fee credits as less and cleaner runoff drains to the public system. One agency in the Austin area, the Lower Colorado River Authority, offers these water demand reduction BMPs that receive stormwater quality credits through its Highland Lakes Watershed Ordinance program.

G53 11:00 - 11:30 a.m.
Evaluation of Low Impact Development Incentives and Multiple Benefits
Daniel Apt, RBF Consulting, Irvine, CA
Gian Villarreal, Michael Baker International, San Antonio, TX
LID projects within a watershed can help achieve multiple goals, and in some places stormwater permits or other requirements promote implementation of LID. However, in areas without such requirements, it is critical to understand and incentivize implementation of LID. In addition to improving hydrologic functions and water-quality within a watershed, LID can reduce project costs and infrastructure needs. This presentation explores the multiple benefits of LID and incentives that can help get LID projects in the ground.

STORMWATER PROGRAM MANAGEMENT

Room 203-204

P51 10:00 - 10:30 a.m.
We Hear You! City of Fort Worth Addresses Development Review Concerns
Kelly Dillard, Freese and Nichols, Fort Worth, TX
Erika Nordstrom, Freese and Nichols, Fort Worth, TX
Greg Simmons, City of Fort Worth, TX
In 2006, the city of Fort Worth adopted new drainage criteria for all design and construction within the city, requiring thorough reviews. Soon after, development slowed with the downturn in the economy; when it picked up again in 2009, the city began to receive complaints regarding the drainage review process. The city began a review of the process, incorporating feedback from developers. This presentation highlights the joint effort between the city and development community and the analytical problem-solving techniques used to identify problems and improve the process.

P52 10:30 - 11:00 a.m.
How to Maximize the Effectiveness of Your MS4 Stormwater Program by Using Risk-Based Stormwater Asset Management
Mark VanAuken, ARCADIS US, Akron, OH
Anwer Ahmed, ARCADIS US, Atlanta, GA
While water and wastewater systems typically have dedicated funding sources, identifying the most cost-effective approach to stormwater management can be a struggle. MS4 communities can use a risk-based asset management approach to help prioritize capital investments. This presentation details the process of obtaining stormwater asset data, provides examples of the data analysis process, and describes how the data can be used to develop a cost-effective asset management program. The asset condition assessment process evaluates the current physical state and performance capabilities of each asset to establish its probability of failure—although an asset in excellent physical condition that does not meet regulatory or capacity requirements is still a problem and should be addressed to reduce overall risk. A triple-bottom-line approach is used to score the consequence of failure of the asset and takes into consideration costs to implement program enhancements and BMPs to address regulatory requirements, among other factors. Case studies for DC Water; Chesterfield County, VA; and the Georgia DOT will be reviewed.

P53 11:00 - 11:30 a.m.
Utilizing Asset Management Database Systems to Meet NPDES Requirements
Don Robinett, City of SeaTac, WA
One of the most time-consuming requirements of municipal stormwater permits is the need for program tracking and reporting. While most jurisdictions have permit tracking database systems, many have not implemented this technology in their operations and maintenance or illicit discharge detection and elimination programs. This presentation shows how the city of SeaTac is using a GIS integrated asset management database to help meet its NPDES tracking and reporting requirements; this approach to compliance can be useful to any permittee with O&M and IDDE requirements and can be applied to most GIS linked asset management database systems.

ADVANCED RESEARCH TOPICS

Room 406

R51 10:00 - 10:30 a.m.

Evolving HSPF Into an Open-Source Model
Drew Ackerman, RESPEC, Denver, CO
Watershed-scale environmental models are increasingly being used to assist in developing watershed-based approaches for protecting and restoring water bodies. The Hydrological Simulation program-Fortran is an important tool in watershed-based assessment and planning. The HSPF model contains more than 100,000 lines of Fortran-77 code and uses an outdated binary file called a Watershed Data Management (WDM) file to store time-series data. The WDM file was a highly effective format when it was created, but it has not kept up with advancing technology that has caused increasing limitations on its use. The overall goal of this project is to solve the challenges that currently face the HSPF model so it will continue to be a premiere watershed model. Major objectives are discussed. Converting HSPF to a more widely used platform-independent language and manageable file storage will increase its users and result in more efficient applications. Providing this capability as open-source software will allow for accelerated evolution by leveraging resource efforts throughout the water resource modeling community.

R52 10:30 - 11:00 a.m.
Use of CFD in the Development of a Screened Baffle Box
Jeremy Fink, Hydro International, Portland, ME
Stormwater screening systems have a long history of removing gross visible pollutants from waterways, and have recently been used for removing waste plant matter such as leaves and twigs. Proprietary screening BMPs typically also need to remove and store fine sediment and retain captured sediment during high-flow storm events. Performance of these systems is measured in the laboratory and in the field. This high level of performance and the testing required makes development of new proprietary BMPs time consuming and expensive. By simulating designs using computational fluid dynamics, development time and expense for a new BMP can be reduced dramatically. This presentation describes the three phases of a compressed product development cycle that allowed for rapid introduction of a new, screened baffle box BMP. A literature review created a benchmark for performance comparisons. A simulation phase of the project predicted and ranked 12 different concepts for performance improvement and allowed for the selection of the top performer. In the third phase, the top-performing design was built as a prototype and tested in the laboratory to validate the simulations.

R53 11:00 - 11:30 a.m.
Predictive Performance Scaling Method for Hydrodynamic Separators Using the Peclet Number
Mark Miller, AquaShield Inc., Chattanooga, TN
Laboratory performance tests of hydrodynamic separators rely on controlled parameters such as flow rates, particle size distribution, sediment concentrations, sediment specific gravity, and water temperature. It is challenging to make direct performance evaluation comparisons between different systems, especially when different test sediment particle sizes were used. This presentation explores a predictive performance method using the Peclet Number that allows for a comparison between system performance curves and predicted performance curves for different particle sizes. This method provides a simple means to prepare hydrodynamic separator sizing charts based on a different particle size from that tested in the lab to meet varying treatment specifications.

WATER-QUALITY MONITORING

Room 408-409

Q51 10:00 - 10:30 a.m.
Assessing the Impacts of Stormwater Controls on a Watershed Basis
Roger Glick, City of Austin Watershed Protection Department, Austin, TX
Austin has required various stormwater controls for new development since the mid-1970s and has had a program to retrofit controls in underserved areas since the 1990s. The performance of these controls has been based on end-of-pipe evaluations. This study evaluates the overall impacts of these controls on a watershed basis using the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT). A SWAT model will be developed for a watershed in the Austin area and will include stormwater controls for flooding (detention) and water quality (sedimentation, filtration, wet ponds, etc.). The impacts on the watershed will be evaluated at multiple points with respect to flooding, erosion, and aquatic health. The level of controls needed to achieve desired targets will also be addressed.

Q52 10:30 - 11:00 a.m.
A Case Study Demonstrating Analysis of Stormflows, Concentrations, and Nutrient Loads in Highway Runoff and Swale Discharge with SELDM
Gregory Granato, US Geological Survey, Northborough, MS
Susan Jones, Federal Highway Administration, Washington, DC
Decision-makers need information about the quality and quantity of runoff, the risk for adverse effects of runoff on receiving waters, and the potential effectiveness of mitigation measures to reduce these risks. The Stochastic Empirical Loading and Dilution Model (SELDM) was designed to help inform water management decisions for streams and lakes receiving runoff from highways and other land uses. This presentation describes SELDM and shows how the model uses Monte Carlo methods to generate storm flows, concentrations, and loads from a highway site and an upstream basin to provide needed risk-based information. In this example, total nitrogen and total phosphorus are the constituents of concern.

Q53 11:00 - 11:30 a.m.
An HSPF Decision Support System to Guide Watershed Management
Seth Kenner, RESPEC, Rapid City, SD
Stakeholders in the Central Big Sioux River watershed have come together over the past seven years to address water-quality concerns through development of a TMDL assessment, a water-quality master plan, and a water-quality credit trading program. The TMDL assessment involved implementation of an innovative and adaptive monitoring plan and the development of a Hydrologic Simulation Program Fortran (HSPF) watershed model application. Results indicated that runoff from agricultural lands as well as stormwater discharges from permitted MS4s are contributing sediment and bacterial impairments within the streams. The master plan provided information that identified significant sources contributing to impairment and helped prioritize placement of BMPs. The HSPF model was used to understand which sources were significant contributors of bacteria and sediment and to assess the effects of different management scenarios.

TEXAS A&M TRACK

Room 404

 


 

 


Wednesday, August 5, 1:30 - 3:00 p.m.

BMP CASE STUDIES

Room 402-403

B61 1:30 - 2:00 p.m.
Implementation and Monitoring of Bioretention Gardens
Kent Holm, Douglas County Environmental Services, Omaha, NE
This presentation provides an overview of LID projects in Douglas County, NE, to reduce stormwater entering Omaha’s combined sewer. Although bioretention gardens have been used for years, questions still exist about their effectiveness. The US Geological Survey and Douglas County Environmental Services are measuring the water budget at two bioretention cells in Omaha to evaluate their effectiveness at reducing stormwater outflows, measuring inflow, precipitation, evapotranspiration, infiltration and outflow through an overflow standpipe. Methods, instrumentation, and results to date will be presented.

B62 2:00 - 2:30 p.m.
Using Permeable Interlocking Concrete Pavers as a Pretreatment for an Underground Rainwater Harvesting System
Ryan Winston, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC
This case study describes an existing parking lot retrofitted with permeable interlocking concrete pavers (PICP) over Type D soils in north-central Ohio. The system had a 3:1 loading ratio with 8,700 square feet of impermeable asphalt draining onto 2,900 square feet of PICPs. There was approximately 20 inches of aggregate underlying the pavers with an elbow in the underdrain to promote infiltration into the poorly draining soils. Any underdrain flow passed into a cistern below a portion of the PICP. Runoff, underdrain flow, cistern storage volume, and bypass from the stormwater control measures were measured using pressure transducers, and water-quality samples were taken from the inflow to the system and from the cistern. Results to date will be presented.

B63 2:30 - 3:00 p.m.
Highway Runoff Treatment Using Vegetated Filter Strips
Kevin White, University of South Alabama, Mobile, AL
Use of vegetated filter strips to treat highway runoff was evaluated at four locations along two major highways in Mobile, AL. Effluent quality at four distances from edge-of-pavement were evaluated for suspended solids, metals, nutrients, and aquatic toxicity and compared to natural background conditions. Filter strip treatment performance was evaluated for correlation with highway side slope, filter strip length, rainfall intensity, and antecedent conditions over an 18-month period. Overall, vegetated filter strips were found to be effective in lowering concentrations of total suspended solids, copper, lead, and cadmium and in reducing aquatic toxicity of highway runoff. Removal of runoff constituents was optimal at filter strip length of 4 meters or greater. Slope was not found to influence performance.

 

GREEN INFRASTRUCTURE

Room 201-202

G61 1:30 - 2:00 p.m.
A Sustainable Approach to Financing of Green Infrastructure
Laurie Hawks, Brown and Caldwell, Atlanta, GA
Alice Champagne, City of Roswell, GA
The city of Roswell, GA, faced the challenge of protecting local streams, several of which are listed as not meeting water-quality standards for fecal coliform due to urban runoff. This city also wanted to accommodate redevelopment in historic areas. The city set up a program to install green infrastructure in city-owned rights of way and other properties to treat runoff; green infrastructure is a preferred alternative to traditional BMPs, which may require valuable space on a limited site. Developers can elect to buy water-quality treatment credits, and these funds are set aside to install future green infrastructure projects. The presentation covers issues such as site selection, types of green infrastructure BMPs, how water-quality credits are developed and prices assigned, performance models and monitoring assessment, maintenance, and costs.

G62 2:00 - 2:30 p.m.
Co-Benefits and Comprehensive Costs of Green Infrastructure in New York City
Matthew Jones, Hazen and Sawyer, Raleigh, NC
Although green infrastructure is known as an effective way to manage stormwater runoff, its additional benefits might not be immediately obvious or easily quantified. The New York City Department of Environmental Protection conducted a study to comprehensively examine the costs and benefits of green infrastructure using a triple-bottom-line approach. The study consisted of a literature review, pilot monitoring efforts, lifecycle analyses, and development of a co-benefits calculator and comparison tool. The tool is set up for users to enter basic design characteristics for a selected control type and receive quantitative results for more than 25 cost and benefit parameters. NYCDEP is now better able to understand the impacts of green infrastructure being implemented throughout the city and has additional validation for the thousands of green infrastructure controls being constructed.

G63 2:30 - 3:00 p.m.
Duke University Water Harvesting Pond
James Caldwell, McAdams, Durham, NC
The Duke University Water Reclamation Pond will provide up to 150 million gallons of harvested stormwater for the university’s centralized chilled water system, saving the university about $400,000 a year in potable water costs. As a response to the 2007 drought, Duke collaborated with McAdams to complete a feasibility study of aboveground water reuse facilities as part of an overall stormwater impact analysis. Multiple sites were identified for facilities, and runoff, demand, and overall yield of each facility were analyzed; one site was chosen for final permitting and construction. The facility will capture runoff from approximately 260 highly urbanized acres of drainage and accommodate 6.7 million gallons of storage.

 

STORMWATER PROGRAM MANAGEMENT

Room 203-204

P61 1:30 - 2:00 p.m.
So Your Stormwater Program Is Being Audited? What to Expect
John Porter, City of Laredo, TX
Riazul Mia, City of Laredo, TX
In 2013, EPA notified the city of Laredo that its stormwater program would be audited—the first audit in the program’s 16-year history. This presentation takes the audience through the various types of information requested, to prepare others for potential future audits. It explores areas in which Laredo’s program performed solidly as well as those that needed improvement. It also discusses the dynamics of preparing co-permittees for an audit, as well as preparing non-stormwater managers who oversee departments that might be affected by stormwater program issues.

P62 2:00 - 2:30 p.m.
Small Pennsylvania Municipalities Form MS4 Coalition for Permit Compliance
Robert May, St. Lawrence Borough, Reading, PA
Berks County, PA, has 73 municipalities, 53 of which were required to obtain NPDES MS4 permits; 37 municipalities in three watersheds formed a coalition to meet permit requirements in a cooperative fashion rather than through individual efforts. The formal partnership required an intergovernmental agreement and municipal ordinances to cover the educational requirements of the permits. This presentation provides insights on establishing a common grid for mapping, database management, and other issues.

P63 2:30 - 3:00 p.m.
BMP Maintenance and Lifecycle Analysis: Preventing Failure
Zachariha Kent, Bio Clean and Modular Wetlands, Oceanside, CA
Stormwater management and maintenance programs are rich research labs for analyzing stormwater system functionality and effectiveness, ultimately leading to heightened levels of development. There are varying degrees of BMP maintenance demands, complexity, and deficiencies. Well-trained and experienced maintenance staff and crew can recognize, adjust, and develop custom methods to improve on BMPs that are failing or whose maintenance costs are overwhelming.  But what puts a site in that situation? What can we learn about the importance of design, municipal demands, and customers’ goals and expectations in the early stages of implementation vs. the later stages of maintenance and compliance? This presentation looks at a handful of mature BMPs in southern California, beginning with the latest cleaning or management reports and stretching back to the design and selection process. The goal is to give decision-makers perspective into their own planning practices and priorities as they relate to BMP lifecycles.

 

ADVANCED RESEARCH TOPICS

Room 406

R61 1:30 - 2:00 p.m.
Factors Affecting Biofilm Growth in Streams Receiving Airport Deicing Runoff
Dean Mericas, Mead & Hunt Inc., Austin, TX
Although much research has been done on biofilm growth in various natural and engineered environments, there has been limited investigation into the relationship between airport activity and biofilm growth in natural stream systems. This issue is significant to airports because biofilm growth can trigger regulatory actions, requiring an airport to limit its contribution to the condition. This presentation discusses prolific biofilm occurrence in streams that receive airport runoff containing deicers and the factors that can affect growth. Field monitoring at two commercial airports and laboratory experiments under controlled conditions at the Center for Biofilm Engineering generated data used in various hypotheses. The monitoring results are discussed and recommendations for future research summarized.

R62 2:00 - 2:30 p.m.
Next-Generation Filter Media for Removal of Bacteria From Stormwater
Christian Nilsen, ReNUWIt, Stanford University, Stanford, CA
About 30% of the nation’s rivers and streams are impaired due to fecal indicator bacteria. Common BMPs such as bioretention and biofilters have been shown to be largely ineffective at removing bacteria from stormwater. Under certain conditions BMPs can be sources, rather than sinks, of indicator bacteria. Recent research at the Engineering Research Center for Reinventing the Nation’s Urban Water Infrastructure (ReNUWit) has shown that new types of engineered filter media can provide superior removal of bacteria compared to traditional soil mixes. Testing has been conducted with iron oxide coated sand and biochar. Results indicate IOCS can remove up to two orders of magnitude more fecal indicator bacteria than sand alone, and biochar up to three orders of magnitude more. Removal capacity is decreased in the presence of natural organic matter, although both still provide superior removal compared to sand alone.

R63 2:30 - 3:00 p.m.
Nutrient Removal Using Coanda Screens
Steve Esmond, Coanda, Irvine, CA
Vinod Balakrishan, Atkins North America, Houston, TX
Current approaches to gross solids removal have focused on 5-mm mesh size and larger; some jurisdictions have adopted a 5-mm mesh size as the standard for full capture removal of trash from urban runoff. Tilted wedgewire Coanda screens have been used for decades in the hydropower and agriculture industries, and their small openings, typically 0.5 to 1.0 mm, have gained increasing favor for removing urban trash and gross solids. Extracting these smaller particles from storm runoff also removes a percentage of particulate pollutants such as nitrogen and phosphorus. In 2012, the city of McAllen, TX, installed a screen with 0.5-mm openings in a tributary to the Rio Grande River. Removals of TSS and nutrients were measured at various hydraulic loading rates and across seven ranges of particle size. Results of this project have been compared with those of previous studies; results of this and other studies are discussed.

 

INDUSTRIAL STORMWATER MANAGEMENT

Room 408-409

D61 1:30 - 2:00 p.m.
Innovative Stormwater Management at the Bay Park Sewage Treatment Plant
Martha E. Cardona, Hazen and Sawyer, Raleigh, NC
Pradeep Rayaprolu, Hazen and Sawyer, New York, NY
In October 2012, the Bay Park Sewage Treatment Plant in Nassau County was severely flooded during Hurricane Sandy. The county initiated mitigation measures to protect the plant from future flood surges, including an 18-foot levee-floodwall combination. As a result of sealing the facility below this critical elevation, an innovative approach was required to address the risk of localized flooding. Stormwater runoff at the plant is currently collected by a storm sewer network and conveyed to two outfalls, which will be closed during a surge event to prevent backflow. Therefore, two stormwater pumping stations were designed to handle 10-year flood events up to 100-year events without significant flooding. Stormwater modeling was an important component of the design and was also used to identify other potential improvements at the plant.

D62 2:00 - 2:30 p.m.
Fallacy of the First Flush Discharge, and Field Tests Assessing Filtration as NAL-Compliant Treatment in a Scrap Yard
Roger Griffin, Ecology Auto Parts, Irvine, CA
California’s 2014 General Industrial Stormwater Permit requires significant improvements in stormwater discharge quality and has given industry hard deadlines to meet numeric action levels (NALs). Previous government directives focused on analyzing the first-flush discharge as being indicative of success or failure in meeting BMP and NAL treatment goals. The new permit has prompted a closer look at previous assumptions and sources of contaminants. In the scrap metal recycling industry, the most challenging NALs have been the sub-parts-per-million levels of metal in discharges. One facility conducted a field test allowing for a continuous two-day “rain” across a paved area during the dry summer season. The yard was spray-inundated for eight hours each day with fire hydrant water reaching all areas: scrap piles, yard equipment, transport vehicles, and other areas. Runoff samples were taken for onsite and laboratory analysis; the “pseudo-rain” was then pumped through a commercially available filtration system and outlet samples were taken. Over the course of the two days, pH, conductivity, turbidity, and oil and grease varied by only about 10% and inlet total metals by about 20%, contradicting the first-flush theory. Using the commercially available treatment system, aluminum, copper, and zinc did not meet the NALs at all; lead and cadmium met the standard on the first day. Based on this test, significantly different approaches to stormwater treatment are needed to meet NALs.

D63 2:30 - 3:00 p.m.
Subsurface Gravity-Based Media Filtration for a Marine Terminal
Ross Dunning, Kennedy/Jenks Consultants, Federal Way, WA
Tison Mach, Port of Seattle, Seattle, WA
The Port of Seattle leases its 90-acre Terminal 46 marine cargo facility for containerized cargo import and export cargo operations. Stormwater runoff from the facility is covered under the state Department of Ecology Industrial Stormwater General Permit, which includes some of the country’s most stringent regulations for industrial runoff. The port wanted to evaluate and confirm its strategic direction for stormwater conveyance and treatment at T46 and move forward with final design; preliminary engineering was performed to evaluate the existing drainage system and 14 different alternatives. The work included an existing conditions assessment, field evaluations, and hydrologic/hydraulic modeling to evaluate existing system capacity and develop conceptual design and order of magnitude cost estimates. The process showed that installation of subsurface gravity-based media filtration treatment systems at four locations would be a quarter of the cost of installing one single treatment facility. Onsite pilot testing was used to estimate treatment performance capability of the media filtration technology under actual site conditions. The subsurface treatment systems were ultimately designed with a goal of meeting ISGP requirements while maximizing use of the existing infrastructure.

 

TEXAS A&M TRACK

Room 404

PANEL SESSION—1:30 - 4:30 p.m.

From Stones to Drones: Planning and Promoting Your Stormwater Program
Room 401
This three-hour panel discussion is designed to allow active MS4 programs to talk about their green, sustainable stormwater programs.  Panel members will provide firsthand experiences of how their program was started and measurable outreach benefits such as public support and successful BMPs. There will be time for audience questions. General topics for the panelists to address include meeting EPA regulations; planning stormwater programs including selecting and prioritizing BMPs; and selling stormwater—communicating with residents and elected officials, using social media, and conducting public school outreach.
Panelists include Don Waye and Ralph Spagnolo of EPA; Anna Lantin of Michael Baker International on the iWATR BMP tool; Jim Peterson on using drones for watershed studies; Bill Stack of the Center for Watershed Management on effective stormwater planning; and Sandy Hertz of the Maryland State Highway Administration on effective BMP construction for roadways.

 

Wednesday, August 5, 3:30 - 5:00 p.m.

BMP CASE STUDIES

Room 402-403

B71 3:30 - 4:00 p.m.
Bioretention Retrofit for Industrial Stormwater Treatment at the Port of Longview, WA
Alan Flemming, Kennedy/Jenks Consultants, Portland, OR
The Port of Longview, a public port district consisting of 550 acres on the northern bank of the Columbia River, imports and exports commodities ranging from calcined coke to logs. Tenant operations on private property within the port boundary also include steel manufacturing, grain export, log sorting and storage, and fuel distribution. The port’s operations are covered under Washington’s Industrial Stormwater General Permit, so stormwater discharges must meet some of the most stringent benchmarks in the country. The port has implemented a variety of BMPs and treatment solutions. This case study presents the process of design, regulatory approval, and construction of a half-acre bioretention treatment system retrofit, with challenges such as shallow groundwater and limited grades.

B72 4:00 - 4:30 p.m.
Lowertown Ballpark (CHS Field): A Home Run for Stormwater Reuse
Nate Zwonitzer, Capitol Region Watershed District, St. Paul, MN
Wes Saunders-Pearce, City of St. Paul, MN
In constructing the new Lowertown Ballpark, designers had to be creative in finding opportunities to manage stormwater on a site with limited space and soil contamination. A partnership between the city of St. Paul, Capitol Region Watershed District, and Metropolitan Council resulted in a suite of BMPs, including the state’s first municipal reuse system for indoor use. BMPs onsite include rain gardens, filtration swales, tree trenches with engineered soil, and underground storage. Because of the soil contamination, all BMPs were lined and configured with underdrains to provide filtration and prevent groundwater contamination. Each BMP is designed to reduce sediment load to the Mississippi River by more than 90%.

B73 4:30 - 5:00 p.m.
Stormwater Treatment Retrofits in an Urban Industrial Park
Daniel Diffin, Sevee & Maher Engineers, Cumberland, ME
This presentation details a structural stormwater management retrofit project on a 33-acre subcatchment within the Long Creek watershed in Westbrook, ME. Achievements include cost-effective, sustainable stormwater management solutions; runoff treatment for more than 91% of impervious area and more than 88% of the subcatchment watershed; one of the state’s first gravel wetlands; use of geothermal exchange onsite to cool surface runoff; use of a sizing method to maximize pollutant-heavy first-flush capture and treatment; and minimal impact to private land owners.

GREEN INFRASTRUCTURE

Room 201-202

G71 3:30 - 4:00 p.m.
The State of the Science and Practice of Using Urban Trees as a Stormwater Control Measure
Peter MacDonagh, The Kestrel Design Group, Minneapolis, MN
Stormwater professionals have been studying stormwater control measures for decades, and foresters have been studying and growing urban trees for centuries, but the practice of combining the two to use trees as a stormwater control measure is still in its infancy. This presentation covers policy development, research quantifying tree stormwater benefits, and techniques for maximizing those benefits. New research developments include results showing water-quality benefits for urban tree/soil systems equal to or surpassing that of many traditional bioretention systems. Case studies will show examples of how to integrate urban tree/soil stormwater control measures into urban landscapes of different scales and show some of the benefits trees provide in addition to stormwater benefits.

G72 4:00 - 4:30 p.m.
Permeable Pavement Design and Construction for Allston Way, Berkeley, CA
David Hein, Applied Research Associates, Toronto, ON
The city of Berkeley, CA, recently completed the rehabilitation of a section of Allston Way in the downtown core. In keeping with the city’s progressive image and to help reduce stormwater runoff and improve water quality, the rehabilitation included the installation of permeable interlocking concrete pavement. The city wanted to evaluate the effectiveness of permeable pavements for stormwater management and used a suitability matrix including 10 evaluation criteria to assess the suitability of installing PICP for seven candidate projects. This presentation outlines the selection process, pavement design, lifecycle cost comparison with conventional alternative pavements, and lessons learned from construction of the roadway. Maintenance evaluation guidelines are also presented, along with procedures for utility cuts and their restoration.

G73 4:30 - 5:00 p.m.
Design of a Bioretention Pilot Facility in a Cold Climate
Miao Yu, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB
A major concern for expanding bioretention applications in cold climates has been that their overall treatment capacity and efficiency will be compromised because the biological activity will be inhibited by the soil frost formed during the prolonged winter season. To adapt bioretention as an LID practice in cold climates, extensive research is needed on soil adsorption capacities and rates, water balance, pollutant uptake by plant, and maintenance requirements under winter conditions. Objectives of this study were to quantify pollutant removal in bioretention box planters, analyze water balance of storm events, and investigate operating mechanisms. Facility design, testing procedures, and results are presented; preliminary results indicate a bioretention box planter can treat a four-hour storm event without overflowing untreated stormwater downstream.

 

STORMWATER PROGRAM MANAGEMENT

Room 203-204

P71 3:30 - 4:00 p.m.
Rethinking Teaching and Learning Stormwater Practices: A National Resource for Professionals
Eleanor Burkett, University of Minnesota, Brainerd, MN
Shahram Missaghi, University of Minnesota, Farmington, MN
A collaborative group of stormwater educators, researchers, and professionals from across the country has been leading the effort to develop a publicly available, uniform, comprehensive stormwater core curriculum education that can be readily used by educators, local governments, and professionals. The core curriculum is defined as a set of practices, along with the fundamental science behind them and their design, construction, and maintenance. The first set of modules has been developed. This presentation covers the process of curriculum development, evaluation metrics, the curriculum itself, and ways to access and use it. 

P72 4:00 - 4:30 p.m.
Business Intelligence for Stormwater Program Management
Dane Jablonsky, Brown and Caldwell, Virginia Beach, VA
The Montgomery County Department of Environmental Protection deployed a business intelligence system as part of its stormwater program. A significant portion involves the management of numerous capital construction projects. The DEP wanted a project portfolio management system that would help identify and prioritize potential stormwater capital projects, evaluate CIP scenarios and resource requirements, assist with schedule and cost performance, allow access to third parties like engineers and contractors, and communicate program status. The system was deployed at the beginning of 2014 and currently includes more than 160 projects.

P73 4:30 - 5:00 p.m.
You Can Teach Old Stormwater Pros New Design Tricks
Elaine Webb, Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control, Dover, DE
A paradigm shift is occurring in stormwater management. Stormwater design professionals with years of experience have need of training alongside fresh young designers. The “old pros” accustomed to calculating peak discharges must now also consider stormwater volume, recharge, and runoff reduction. Delaware’s change to a runoff reduction management goal requires designers to begin looking at green technology BMPs in earnest, not just as token practices. Breaking the “pipe-to-pond” design habit has proven challenging for many. This presentation covers methods Delaware is using to involve experienced professionals in the development of revised sediment and stormwater regulations and the development of a new runoff reduction compliance tool, as well as a training effort by the Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control.

 

ADVANCED RESEARCH TOPICS

Room 406

R71 3:30 - 4:00 p.m.
Performance Evaluations of Erosion and Sediment Control BMPs Using Independent Full-Scale Simulations
Joel Sprague, TRI Environmental, Greenville, SC
To help protect water quality from sediment pollution, regulatory agencies and site designers are increasingly responsible for determining how well specific BMPs will perform, quantitatively, relative to alternatives. To this end, the National Transportation Product Evaluation Program (NTPEP) was developed to provide quality and responsive engineering to the testing and evaluation of products, materials, and devices commonly used. This presentation describes the large-scale performance tests in NTPEP’s program for erosion and sediment control products and reviews results of these tests on a range of erosion and sediment control BMPs.

R72 4:00 - 4:30 p.m.
Flocculated Sediment: What Are the Implications for Erosion and Sediment Control?
Jihoon Kang, University of Texas-Pan American, Edinburg, TX
There is increasing interest in controlling turbidity in construction-site runoff using various chemical flocculation treatments. Flocculated sediment is likely to behave much differently than unflocculated sediment, suggesting changes to current sediment basin design. This project was initiated to characterize the effects of chemical flocculation on sediment properties and evaluate how it might affect design basin size.

R73 4:30 - 5:00 p.m.
Analysis of Bioretention Soil Media for Improved Nitrogen, Phosphorus, and Copper Retention
Curtis Hinman, Herrera Environmental Consultants, Seattle, WA
Douglas Howie, Washington State Department of Ecology, Lacey, WA
Washington State requires the use of LID practices as a first option for managing stormwater where feasible, and bioretention is the most widely applicable and flexible BMP in the suite of LID practices. Bioretention systems may include underdrains, in which case a portion of the treated runoff is discharged back into the stormwater conveyance system rather than infiltrated. Although bioretention can provide very good water-quality treatment for many contaminants (sediment, zinc, hydrocarbons, and possibly bacteria), research indicates nitrogen, phosphorus, and copper might be exported from these systems. This presentation describes a Washington Department of Ecology-funded project focused on optimizing bioretention soil media for improved retention of N, P, and Cu.

 

TEXAS A&M TRACK

Room 404

 


 

 


Thursday, August 6, 8:00 - 9:30 a.m.

GREEN INFRASTRUCTURE I

Room 402-403

G81 8:00 - 8:30 a.m.
Talking Dollars and Sense: Low Impact Development Construction Costs
Justin Ring, EHRA, Houston, TX
One of the biggest arguments against implementing LID, especially in the Houston region, has been construction costs. Most developers believe LID will increase costs. A 90-acre tract in Fort Bend County southwest of Houston is under development. The goal of the single-family residential tract was to create a development where every lot was amenitized. This was originally achieved by a large detention and amenity lake in the middle of the development, which gave every lot waterfront property. However, EHRA also presented the developer with an LID concept that amenitized each lot with green space rather than water. After a comparison of preliminary construction cost estimates showed the LID construction costs were comparable, and that the LID layout resulted in an additional 90 lots on the 90-acre tract, the developer proceeded with the LID plan.

G82 8:30 - 9:00 a.m.
Green Infrastructure Reduces CSO Flows and Saves Money
Richard Besancon, Burns and McDonnell Engineering Company, Omaha, NE
As part of Omaha’s combined sewer overflow program, the city selected Burns and McDonnell to evaluate and design the Gilmore Avenue Sewer Separation. The company evaluated green infrastructure using the program criteria to determine which areas could be used to incorporate green infrastructure to reduce storm flows. The Gilmore Avenue watershed incorporates a regional dry detention basin with constructed wetlands and bioretention within a local park. This presentation covers the evaluation and design, and how unique hydraulic characteristics within the existing system required redefining the goals and objectives of the green infrastructure.

G83 9:00 - 9:30 a.m.
Million$ for MIDS
Todd Shoemaker, Wenck Associates, Woodbury, MN
Leslie Stovring, City of Eden Prairie, MN
The city of Eden Prairie is preparing for the opening of the Southwest Light Rail Transit in 2018. In the planning stage since 1980, the proposed station within the Eden Prairie town center is expected to ignite redevelopment opportunities. The city initiated a study to streamline the design process and to plan for area-wide green stormwater infrastructure that could provide much-needed pollutant removal to downstream lakes. The study outlines alternatives for development of shared, stacked-function green infrastructure. If all the potential practices were implemented, runoff volume would be reduced by 63%, TSS by 83%, and total phosphorus by 72%, in addition to reducing excess nutrients.

 

GREEN INFRASTRUCTURE II

Room 408-409

G84 8:00 - 8:30 a.m.
Maintaining for Success: Considerations for Green Infrastructure Operations and Maintenance
Daniel Wible, CH2M Hill, Philadelphia, PA
Susan McDaniels, CH2M Hill, Philadelphia, PA
Green infrastructure is being implemented with greater frequency throughout the country. One challenge is how communities can integrate new and presumably different maintenance protocols into their existing maintenance programs and operating budgets. This presentation draws on examples from throughout the US to provide a framework of green infrastructure maintenance considerations to help guide communities and property owners, beginning with planning and design considerations and innovative approaches for funding large and small maintenance programs. It includes real-world strategies and success stories from large and small programs in Onondaga County, NY; Lancaster, PA; and Cincinnati, OH.

G85 8:30 - 9:00 a.m.
Maintenance Guidelines for Permeable Pavement Systems
David Hein, Applied Research Associates, Toronto, ON
This presentation provides details on how to objectively assess the surface condition of permeable interlocking concrete pavements and take maintenance action necessary to ensure the long-term hydraulic and structural performance of the pavement. The key for cost-effective preventive maintenance is applying the appropriate treatment at the right time, identifying sections that would benefit the most from preventive maintenance. Discussion includes maintaining permeability of the pavement surface; stability of pavement including edge restraints; and localized deficiencies such as missing pavers, rutting, and cracked pavers. Recommendations for an annual monitoring program are provided.

G86 9:00 - 9:30 a.m.
Dirty Streets to Dirty BMPs: Maintaining Clean Stormwater BMPs Along Roadways
Mary Travaglini, Montgomery County, MD, Department of Environmental Protection, Rockville, MD
If you built a public bathroom, would you arrange to clean it? If you bought a car, would you schedule oil changes? Once all of the landscape designers, engineers, planners, and builders walk away from a new stormwater facility, its success is guaranteed only by the programs designed to maintain it. The use of LID measures along roadways, which are subject to harsh impacts from sediment, also require nonstructural maintenance of plants and mulch. This presentation provides examples of types of maintenance, frequencies, costs, equipment, and labor hours required to do the job right. Examples are included from Montgomery County, which is currently responsible for the function and aesthetics of more than 200 bioretention sites, bioswales, and rain gardens in roadway rights of way.

 

STORMWATER PROGRAM MANAGEMENT

Room 407

P82 8:30 - 9:00 a.m.
Making “Sump-thing” Happen: Nassau County Stormwater Basin #232, A Case History of Sustainability
Robert M. Alvey, Garden City, NY
Junior Roberts, York College, Jamaica, NY
The rapid development of Long Island after World War II resulted in a significant decline of open space, leading to a decrease in plant and animal species. Creative use of remaining open areas, such as stormwater basins (locally known as “sumps”), helps preserve and restore these areas. Nassau County’s Department of Public Works owns a network of about 600 stormwater basins, many of which are suitable for dual beneficial use by local residents as passive parks, nature preserves, bird sanctuaries, wildlife education centers, and recreational areas. This presentation highlights collaborative efforts with volunteer and local residential organizations to provide maintenance, management, and funding for these areas. More than 8,000 volunteers have participated since 1995.

P83 9:00 - 9:30 a.m.
MS4 Community Education, Outreach, and Involvement Through Art
Elizabeth Arceneaux, Texas State University, San Marcos, TX
Shawn Wolfshohl, City of San Marcos, TX
This presentation describes the creation and implementation of an art contest for storm drain cover design. The city of San Marcos and Texas State University, each with a separate MS4 permit, collaborated on the contest as a joint effort to fulfill the education and outreach permit measure. Patterned after a successful contest held in Springfield, MO, the effort promoted stormwater awareness and generated widespread public interest.

 

TEXAS A&M TRACK

Room 404

 



Thursday, August 6, 10:00 - 11:30 a.m.

GREEN INFRASTRUCTURE

Room 402-403

G91 10:00 - 10:30 a.m.
Low Impact Development Strategies in Central Texas and the Edwards Aquifer Recovery Implementation Program
Jason Maldonado, Lockwood, Andrews and Newnam, Houston, TX
Claire Hempel, Design Workshop, Austin, TX
Zac Martin, City of New Braunfels, TX
The Edwards Aquifer Recovery Implementation Program (EARIP) is a unique program involving various stakeholders who collaborate on the management of the aquifer. They were required to apply for a permit under the Endangered Species Act and develop a Habitat Conservation Plan. One of the stakeholders, the city of New Braunfels, is developing an LID and water-quality control program to decrease impervious cover as a measure to comply with the plan. This presentation looks at the background of the program, challenges, strategies, and recent progress of the LID activities.

G93 10:30 - 11:00 a.m.
The San Marcos Water Quality Protection Plan
John Gleason, John Gleason LLC, Austin, TX
Melani Howard, City of San Marcos, TX
The city of San Marcos has been designated the fastest-growing city in the US for two years in a row. The city is struggling to implement aggressive water-quality protection measures while still allowing appropriate land development. The San Marcos Water Quality Protection Plan is being developed under the authority of the Edwards Aquifer Habitat Conservation Plan, requiring the city and Texas State University to take actions to increase the likelihood of survival and recovery of threatened and endangered species. The plan integrates stormwater management with water conservation practices, water supply protection, and critical habitat protection. The plan establishes BMP performance requirements based on recommendations of the International BMP Database. The plan has also identified dozens of opportunities for stormwater retrofits.

 

STORMWATER PROGRAM MANAGEMENT I

Room 407

P91 10:00 - 10:30 a.m.
Surf and Turf: Characterization of Trash in Water and Land
Donna Chen, City of Los Angeles, CA
In 2012 and 2013, the city of Los Angeles conducted a first-of-its-kind land characterization study of trash upstream from receiving waters at five different land-use areas. Although not required for compliance with the various Los Angeles-area trash TMDLs, the study has provided insight into the composition and quantity of trash. The information will help agencies identify sources and potential methods of transport and may lead to source control decisions, such as plastic bag or polystyrene bans, to most effectively reduce anthropogenic trash. This presentation describes the study and compares its results from those of the Friends of the Los Angeles River Cleanup events, which have been conducted since 1990; the assessment has shown that a disparity does exist in the trash characterization between land and water.

P92 10:30 - 11:00 a.m.
Taking Out the Trash: Setting Achievable Trash Discharge Reduction Goals and Measuring Progress Toward Meeting Them
Vaikko Allen, Contech, Ojai, CA
Various control initiatives have been implemented to limit trash in receiving waters, including street sweeping, product bans, installation of trash capture devices, manual trash cleanup, and public education. These efforts are expensive; in California alone it is estimated that municipalities spend $480 million a year on trash control. In the Los Angeles region, there are 15 trash TMDLs, which set a numeric target of zero trash in the applicable water bodies. The TMDLs outline two compliance pathways, either compliance as determined through water-quality monitoring or through installation of full-capture systems. Most cities have opted for the trash capture system. However, compliance with the TMDL zero trash target is different than achieving a trash-free condition in the receiving waters. Ideally, a water body response in the form of steadily decreasing cleanup costs and trash removal volumes would track with progress toward TMDL compliance, but cleanup records show trash reduction over the last four to eight years has been marginal. This presentation explores the gap between the current calculated trash discharge load of nearly zero and the actual trash loads observed. Factors contributing to the gap are discussed, along with program and policy recommendations, such as better identification and regulation of inputs from private drains; proper selection, sizing and design of treatment controls; and increased maintenance.

P93 11:00 - 11:30 a.m.
An Innovative Tool for Assessing Strategies to Meet Nutrient TMDLs: Orleans, MA, Case Study
Rich Niles, Amec Foster Wheeler, Chelmsford, MA
The town of Orleans has struggled to develop a stormwater management strategy because it is difficult to weigh the benefit of structural stormwater nutrient management strategies against alternative strategies like fertilizer application and septic system upgrades. Orleans has many water bodies impaired due to nutrients and pathogens, with the largest contributor identified as failed or inadequate septic systems. To help focus its funding for future stormwater improvements, the town is using the Amec Load Estimate Reduction Tracking Tool (ALERT), which was developed to evaluate the level of effort and cost for communities to meet TMDL requirements using simple GIS and spreadsheet-based tools. The tool is very visual and allows planners and engineers to quickly view and analyze options.

 

STORMWATER PROGRAM MANAGEMENT II

Room 408-409

P94 10:00 - 10:30 a.m.
Developing a Comprehensive Watershed Management Plan for Water-Quality Improvement and Flood Control
Jeff Herr, Brown and Caldwell, Atlanta, GA
This presentation details the development of a watershed management plan for the 21-square-mile Lake Placid watershed in central Florida, which has both flooding concerns and multiple lakes with water-quality degradation. The approach included extensive field assessment, including water-quality and flow monitoring; hydrologic and hydraulic modeling; modeling of annual runoff volumes and pollutant loads; preparation of hydrologic and nutrient budgets for three lakes; preparation of nutrient assimilation models for three lakes; and evaluation of BMPs for improving flood control and water quality. The plan addresses not only the sources and magnitudes of pollutants but also changes that will occur as the watershed continues to develop.

P95 10:30 - 11:00 a.m.
A Tale of Two Regulations: Arlington’s Unified Stormwater Ordinance and Design Criteria Manual
Benjamin Pylant, Halff Associates, Fort Worth, TX
Mandy Clark, City of Arlington, TX
Stephen Crawford, Halff Associates, Grand Prairie, TX
The city of Arlington’s new design criteria manual and unified stormwater ordinance includes a progressive post-construction stormwater ordinance that incorporates green infrastructure and water-quality requirements for new and redevelopment, while also protecting the city’s remaining natural areas and riparian corridors. The city intends to establish a series of performance standards to guide future development with non-prescriptive measures. The presentation includes discussion of research on post-construction ordinances from benchmark communities throughout the country.

P96 11:00 - 11:30 a.m.
Quantitative Watershed Master Planning for Water-Quality and Urban Runoff Management in San Antonio River Basin
Yu-Chun Su, Lockwood, Andrews & Newnam, Houston, TX
Sheeba Thomas, San Antonio River Authority, San Antonio, TX
Paul Hummel, Aqua Terra Consultants, Decatur, GA
This presentation introduces new concepts on conducting quantitative water-quality and urban runoff management through holistic watershed master planning. A set of tools to work with dynamic water-quality models has been developed to help users identify potentially impaired water bodies, determine required load reduction, and select and plan BMPs. The San Antonio River Authority (SARA) has developed a set of water-quality modeling tools to aid in master planning, including the SARA Load Reduction Tool to automatically determine load reduction needed for each sub-basin and constituent to meet user-specified screening levels using flow-weighted average concentrations, as well as BMP tools to determine optimal combinations to minimize BMP and LID costs while achieving needed load reductions.

 

ADVANCED RESEARCH TOPICS

Room 406

R91 10:00 - 10:30 a.m.
Bridge Stormwater Runoff Analysis and Treatment Options
Scott Taylor, Michael Baker International, Carlsbad, CA
Although many studies have been conducted on the design, operation, and construction of BMPs for highway runoff, few have investigated BMPs specifically for bridge deck runoff. Pollutant loads are similar, but highway pollutant loads can be more easily treated or sequestered, whereas loads from bridge decks are transported directly to receiving waters via dry deposition or stormwater runoff. This presentation describes a process to select the best combination of source control and operational and treatment control BMPs for a bridge crossing a perennial, intermittent, or ephemeral stream, river, lake, or estuary, for virtually any span length.

R92 10:30 - 11:00 a.m.
Performance Evaluation of an Innovative Catch Basin Curb Opening Screen Cover in the City of Los Angeles
Alfredo Magallanes, City of Los Angeles, CA
BMPs available for the retrofit of catch basins for addressing trash TMDLs have evolved slowly until recently. The city of Los Angeles has been leading strategy development for trash TMDLs and will become the largest municipality to reach its final compliance milestone. The city is evaluating a new type of curb opening screen cover, which differs from those currently available in that it is not fully retractable and does not have perforations, which may result in less trash entering the storm drain system. The insert is being installed in a high-trash-generation catchment area within the city, and the downstream outlet of the catchment area is retrofitted with a hydrodynamic full-capture device to gather data on what is pushed past the screen covers during storm events.

R93 11:00 - 11:30 a.m.
Reversing the History of Urban Hydrology
Chris Estes, Estes Design, Charlotte, NC
Can we reverse the effects urban areas have on our surface waters? And can it be done economically? This presentation addresses the mitigating effects of pervious concrete BMPs on a watershed scale, using field data collected over a two-year period. Data are used to project the potential impact of applying the BMPs on a watershed scale, using GIS and hydrologic modeling.

 
TEXAS A&M TRACK

Room 404

Event Venue - JW Marriott Austin

Address:

110 E. 2nd Street
Austin
Texas 78701

Phone:

+1 888 236-2427
code: StormCon

JW Marriott Austin

Miscellaneous information:

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